LAST SHIPPING DATE FOR 2019 WILL BE THURSDAY 12TH DECEMBER.
SHIPPING WILL RESUME ON THE 6TH JANUARY 2020.

Painting Armortek Models / Alu

An unofficial resource of techniques, information and best practice to help you get most from your Armortek model.
Post Reply
michael haerle
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2017 4:01 pm
Been Liked: 5 times

Painting Armortek Models / Alu

Post by michael haerle » Wed Nov 22, 2017 8:00 pm

Hello forum,

I am currently building the Armortek 8.8 Pak 43 as my first model and have a question for the users who have already built and painted an Armortek model. My question to you is because of the painting of the model: So that the primer keeps well, you grind the aluminum with sandpaper before you primed the model. Shoot the aluminum surfaces with glass beads. Or is all this not necessary and you painted the primer directly without preparations?

I look forward to your experiences and tips.

Best regards
Greetings Michael

User avatar
Stephen White
Site Admin
Posts: 2398
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 7:05 pm
Location: Dorset
Has liked: 316 times
Been Liked: 639 times

Re: Painting Armortek Models / Alu

Post by Stephen White » Wed Nov 22, 2017 9:06 pm

Michael hi.

Have a look at second post down on this link:

viewtopic.php?f=2&t=6008&hilit=priming#p50897

And I added on another post:

The purpose of preparing and priming is really threefold, to minimise the chances of dissimilar metal corrosion, to protect the metals and to provide a suitable key for the application of paint. Whether you clean and prime each bit or do it by sub-assemblies is not clear decision. The principal is to get primer onto every surface and I tend therefore to do a trial fit, disassemble, clean and prime and re-assemble, so most parts, including fasteners, have protection. Where fit or tolerance is critical, such as with bearings and bushes, I assemble first and prime the resulting sub-assembly. The motto is probably prime everything but assemble dry where tolerance is important.

As for basecoat and finish, it's a question of accessibility. I tend to apply a basecoat to sub-assemblies as I go on, and then apply finishes and weathering at the end but am changing my approach. Some of the very best builders weather as they go along. It makes for a far less daunting task at the end and it allows you to concentrate on an area and not repeat yourself over the whole vehicle.


There's a further discussion on painting here:

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=5171&hilit=priming

I'm aware the link on the Knowledge Base is broken and I need to re-write it as a stand-alone, all on the to-do list. If you haven't looked at the Knowledge Base, it might help answer your questions but the Forum community is unfailingly helpful.

Best regards

Stephen

User avatar
Adrian Harris
Posts: 3720
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 10:46 pm
Location: Berkshire (UK)
Has liked: 149 times
Been Liked: 253 times

Re: Painting Armortek Models / Alu

Post by Adrian Harris » Wed Nov 22, 2017 9:14 pm

I agree with Stephen above about the order of doing things like sub assemblies, but having seen the number of parts in a Kompact Kit gun, I wonder how KK builders have managed the painting side, as the elevation/traverse mechanisms for instance have tens of parts to each piece.

I doubt many builders have access to bead blasting equipment, but if that is something with which you are familiar and to which you have access then I can't see a problem.

Most will sand the pieces to remove sharp edges or machining marks, then clean thoroughly with a degreaser such as the Upol one Stephen mentions. Once that has dried, prime, in very light coats, with an etch primer. Then start with the base coats.

Adrian.
R.I.P Margaret I.L.Y

michael haerle
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2017 4:01 pm
Been Liked: 5 times

Re: Painting Armortek Models / Alu

Post by michael haerle » Thu Nov 23, 2017 8:57 am

Hello Stephen, hello Adrian,

Thank you for your feedback and tips. You helped me. As a primer, I will now also use UPOL Acid 8.

Thanks again. If there are more tips I'm looking forward to it.

Best regards Michael

User avatar
Adrian Harris
Posts: 3720
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 10:46 pm
Location: Berkshire (UK)
Has liked: 149 times
Been Liked: 253 times

Re: Painting Armortek Models / Alu

Post by Adrian Harris » Thu Feb 15, 2018 9:56 pm

I hope Michael doesn't mind me adding this on the end but I went to my local Halfords today to get some more Upol Acid #8 etch primer and it's now £20 a can!

You can get it delivered from eBay or Amazon for £13 a can, so I guess Halfords will only be used for emergency rations in future.

Adrian.
R.I.P Margaret I.L.Y

Dave Jones
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2017 11:02 am
Been Liked: 11 times

Re: Painting Armortek Models / Alu

Post by Dave Jones » Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:06 am

The current bad weather has given me the time to make a start on my Elefant. Better that than shovelling snow. :lol:

I am currently cleaning and test fitting the main lower and upper hull parts. Once I’m satisfied that all is good to go, it’s time for the etch primer on all of the parts ahead of assembly. Once assembled, I intend to further protect with a coat of automotive red primer. My question is this, do I apply the Zim on to the etch primer and then over spray with the red or apply the red before the Zim.

I’m thinking etch, Zim and then red.

This is my first Armourtek kit, so any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Dave

Steve Norris
Posts: 915
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 11:42 am
Location: Manchester
Has liked: 2 times
Been Liked: 105 times

Re: Painting Armortek Models / Alu

Post by Steve Norris » Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:19 am

Hi Dave.
My method is to etch,red primer, Zim and then top coat, this is the sequence the factories used on the full sized vehicles.
Regards
Steve

Vince Cutajar
Posts: 1128
Joined: Wed Nov 15, 2017 1:43 pm
Location: Malta
Has liked: 149 times
Been Liked: 332 times

Re: Painting Armortek Models / Alu

Post by Vince Cutajar » Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:25 am

I know this could be a stupid question, but what's the purpose of the red primer if there is already an etch primer below it? Just curious.

Vince

Dave Jones
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2017 11:02 am
Been Liked: 11 times

Re: Painting Armortek Models / Alu

Post by Dave Jones » Sat Mar 03, 2018 12:06 pm

Hi Steve

Thanks for the reply, etch, red and Zim it is.

Vince, the red primer simply gives an added layer of protection. Also, the factory applied the base camouflage coat over a red primer, so (and this could be just physiological) it could impart a slightly ‘warmer’ feel to the dunkelgelb.

Again, thanks for the advice.

Dave

John-Heaps
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Aug 12, 2019 12:15 pm
Been Liked: 11 times

Re: Painting Armortek Models / Alu

Post by John-Heaps » Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:18 pm

Hi Guys,
advice wanted, would it be better to use stone chip paint on the underside and sponsons/ running gear of a model or is this not needed, just thinking it might give a bit more protection when running the model.

any advice for and against willingly taken from those who know better (everyone other than me :oops: )

Thanks
Cheers
John

User avatar
Stephen White
Site Admin
Posts: 2398
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 7:05 pm
Location: Dorset
Has liked: 316 times
Been Liked: 639 times

Re: Painting Armortek Models / Alu

Post by Stephen White » Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:21 pm

Really not necessary John. The models are tough. The paint job will look better for some natural wear. Once it's hardened off, acrylic is very tough, as long as it's on a sound substrate. Key to that is thorough degreasing, a good etch primer and an acrylic semi matt varnish over the paint job. The latter isn't really necessary either but I use it as a base for oil paint weathering. You wouldn't want the bottom to look too pristine anyway, surely.

Post Reply